a certain red haired girl

odditiesoflife:

World’s First 3D Images of Snowflakes Falling

Curious History recently posted about the world’s first pictures of snowflakes ever taken in 1885 by William Bentley. We know have another first, the world’s first 3D images of snowflakes caught as they are falling.

Researchers at the University of Utah have teamed up with the National Science Foundation (NSF) to better understand just how fast and in what form snowflakes truly fall. To accomplish this, they used a high-speed Multi-Angle Snowflake Cam (aka “MASC”) to capture real-time 3D images of snowflakes in freefall at Utah’s Alta Ski Area.

The study is reportedly the first of its kind, and it’s already turning up some really interesting results.

Writes John Bohannon for Science NOW:

The classic image of a snowflake is a fluke. That flat, six-sided crystal with delicate filigree patterns of sharp branches occurs in only about one in every 1000 flakes. And a snowflake seen in 3D is another beast entirely. Researchers have developed a camera system that shoots untouched flakes “in the wild” as they fall from the sky. By grabbing a series of images of the tumbling crystals—its exposure time is one-40,000th of a second, compared with about one-200th in normal photography—the camera is revealing the true shape diversity of snowflakes.

Above is a tiny cross section of the variety of snowflakes MASC has photographed in free-fall so far. Check out tons more at the Snowflake Stereography and Fallspeed home page, or – when it’s snowing – at Alta Ski Area’s Snowflake Showcase, where you can watch a live feed of snowflakes falling in real time.

source 1, 2

odditiesoflife:

The Haunted Manor in Gdansk, Poland

In Gdansk, a charming city in Northern Poland, there is a hill. Local residents still refer to it as “Devil’s Hill” due to an old legend. The legend states that this little hill, surrounded by a deep forest and swamps, was a favorite place for witch gatherings. During these gatherings, it is said that some nasty demons were summoned. Legend also says that a very large stone located on the top of the hill was brought there by the devil.

In 1886, the mansion was a home to a restaurant and between 1925 and 1933 it was the headquarters to the Gdansk Freemason’s lodge. After World War 2, the mansion was used as a local television station’s headquarters. All occupants believed the building was haunted and was continuously disturbed by “unknown” forces.

Today the building remains derelict and no one claims ownership. Many of its floors are highly unstable and the south wing of the mansion didn’t survive last winter as two floors collapsed. The only reason the entire building is still standing is due to a solid external wall.

fencehopping:

Fox sleeping in a graveyard.

fencehopping:

Fox sleeping in a graveyard.

odditiesoflife:

Amazing Leaf Art

Spanish-born artist Lorenzo Duran creates intricately beautiful carvings of animals, landscapes and other amazing images by delicately carving leaves of different shapes and sizes. The idea of creating leaf art came to him when he witnessed a caterpillar eating a leaf. To prevent damaging the leaves while completing his pieces, Duran uses a surgical scalpel to shape the image and a dental pointed devise to remove the unwanted cut pieces. You can find more of his work on his website.

source 1, 2

odditiesoflife:

The Transforming Cat Candle

PyroPet is a family of animal shaped candles that each reveal a surprise within as they burn. The first PyroPet product is a cute little cat called “Kisa”. (“Kisa” means “kitty” in Icelandic). A cute cat shaped candle reveals a grinning metallic skeleton inside. The candles are available to pre-order on Kickstarter.

source 1, 2

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